The Den

Tighnabruaich, Scotland

The Den

Tighnabruaich, Scotland

The Den is a small home that sits high on the hill in the town of Tighnabruaich, designed and delivered in collaboration with Technique. The architecture of this building is a product of an ingenious approach to tackling the locations variable weather.

A full metal jacket wraps what remains of the stone walls, the structure of two former room and kitchen apartments. The thermal diagram of the original building is inverted with the imposition of a super-insulated steel overcoat. This technical move dramatically alters the vernacular creating a stealth-like external aesthetic in contrast to a raw cave-like character internally.

Spatially a series of spaces circulate around the machinery of the home from a lower ground sleeping area, through a snug and eating space to finally culminate at a large periscopic window in the upper living.

The house archaeology celebrates its original construction exposing the original timber floors and a series of as-found details.

Glasgow Institute of Architects Award RIAS Architectural Award Shortlisted for RIBA House of Year Award

Summary

Multiple award-winning bespoke homeĀ 

Location

Tighnabruaich, ScotlandĀ 

Client

Private

Status

CompletedĀ 

 

The Den is a small home that sits high on the hill in the town of Tighnabruaich, designed and delivered in collaboration with Technique. The architecture of this building is a product of an ingenious approach to tackling the locations variable weather.

A full metal jacket wraps what remains of the stone walls, the structure of two former room and kitchen apartments. The thermal diagram of the original building is inverted with the imposition of a super-insulated steel overcoat. This technical move dramatically alters the vernacular creating a stealth-like external aesthetic in contrast to a raw cave-like character internally.

Spatially a series of spaces circulate around the machinery of the home from a lower ground sleeping area, through a snug and eating space to finally culminate at a large periscopic window in the upper living.

The house archaeology celebrates its original construction exposing the original timber floors and a series of as-found details.

Glasgow Institute of Architects Award
RIAS Architectural Award
Shortlisted for RIBA House of Year Award